Three Problems with Observation

New York, 2016 The City University of New York Once a semester, all non-tenured and non-certified members of CUNY’s teaching staff are observed at work and reports on their performance submitted to their departments (Agreement). This procedure gives teachers a chance to reflect, receive feedback, and grow. But it’s also problematic. All too often observations become a rote bureaucratic formality. […]

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The Atlanta Compromise Game

  The Atlanta Compromise, Reacting to the Past “No republic is safe that tolerates a privileged class, or denies to any of its citizens equal rights and equal means to maintain them.” – Frederick Douglass   The year is 1895, you are one of a select few who have have been invited by Booker T. Washington to listen to him […]

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The Value of the Non-Evaluative: Rethinking Faculty Observation

Back to Structuring Equality The Value of the Non-Evaluative: Rethinking Faculty Observation Erica Campbell   Two years ago, I was in a second-round job interview for my first fulltime teaching position. I deeply wanted this job. I loved the idea of working in a college environment that privileged teaching over research. My interviewer was the Acting Dean of Academic Affairs […]

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Our Students: Learning to Listen to Multilingual Student Voices

Back to Structuring Equality Our Students: Learning to Listen to Multilingual Student Voices by Joshua Belknap   Local Context: Monolingual Assumptions, Multilingual Dialogues “Help me come up w/a plan?” read the email from my department chair, “ESL students are getting short-changed.” Beneath this terse entreaty she had forwarded along a message written by a Music and Art Department professor to […]

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Introduction: How and Why to Structure a Classroom for Student-Centered Learning and Equality

Back to Structuring Equality Introduction:  How and Why To Structure a Classroom for Student-Centered Learning and Equality Cathy N. Davidson   Finding Better, More Equitable Ways to Learn What is the best way to learn?  Clearly there are many methods, tactics, technologies, strategies, theories, and practices that can help us all to learn better, to teach better, and, in general, […]

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Orchestrating A Student-Centered Classroom: A How-To Guide

Back to Structuring Equality Orchestrating a Student-Centered Classroom: A How-To Guide This semester, students in “American Literature, American Learning” explored the idea that you can’t counter structural inequalities (in the classroom and elsewhere) with goodwill; instead, you must build structures for equality. As educators, one place we can begin structuring for equality is in the spaces we are in charge […]

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Literature as a Learning Tool: A Lesson Plan

Back to Structuring Equality Literature as a Learning Tool: A Lesson Plan Nicky Hutchins As a parent, college student, peer tutor and future college professor, I want to address and help solve an important learning issue.   Within the late twentieth century, there has been an increase on the emphasis placed on elementary, middle and high school educators and administrators to […]

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Translingualism: Linguistic Multiplicity as Asset Rather than Deficit

Sometimes teachers—myself included— fail to value or even acknowledge the variety of Englishes that our students bring into our classrooms, and when this happens I would argue that we miss an opportunity to engage with and teach our students more effectively. Instructors who begin to familiarize themselves with global, multilingual contexts of English are better able to draw upon their […]

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