Author: Damele

Reflection on Simone Browne’s Dark Matters by Damele E. Collier

Simon Browne posits, “While Foucault argued that the decline of the spectacle of public torture as punishment might have marked “a slackening of the hold on the body,”…

Reflection on Richard Wright’s “I Choose Exile” by Damele E. Collier

In Richard Wright’s 1951 article “I Choose Exile,” he describes his life in France that, according to him, is free from the overt racism he faces as a…

Reflection on “No Exit: From Bandung to Ghana” by Damele E. Collier

In Race Against Empire, Penny M. Von Eschen’s chapter, “No Exit: From Bandung to Ghana,” discusses the role of a prominent Black politician in the 1955 Asian-African Conference in Bandung,…

Reflections on The Narrows by Damele E. Collier

In Ann Petry’s neglected 1953 novel The Narrows, she forcefully, and perhaps even poetically, grapples with the intersectionality of race, class and gender. While she explores interracial relationships,…

Brown Girl, Brownstones Reflection by Damele Elliott Collier

In Brown Girl, Brownstones, Paule Marshall depicts feminist characters who embody bravery, anguish, and the unbending determination to strain past their circumstances, demanding to be heard and to…

Reflections on Yesterday Will Make You Cry by Chester Himes – Damele E. Collier

I rarely say this, but the introduction of Yesterday Will Make You Cry, written by Melvin Van Peebles was fascinating. It was a befitting preface to the true intention, and…

Response to Maxwell’s “Total Literary Awareness” by Damele E. Collier

In “Total Literary Awareness: How the FBI Pre-read African American Writing,” I found William J. Maxwell’s description of the “machinery of political repression” intriguing. It seems this machine…

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