Hacking Digital Accessibility

By Jessica Murray|October 13, 2016|Announcements, Events of Interest, Reflection, Research|0 comments

I often feel fortunate to live in New York City and I’m privileged to be able to easily access experiences and information as I make my way through the city. From an outside perspective, I also understand the barriers that people with disabilities face on a daily basis. My research interests have been primarily focused on obstacles in the built environment that impact the mobility of people with physical disabilities,

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Diversity in Social Research Methods: Embracing More Representative Understandings of Equity and Social Justice

By Michael Dorsch|February 3, 2016|Reflection, Research|0 comments

Our research work at the Futures Initiative in our inaugural and second years has explored questions of access and diversity that are central to our mission of promoting equity and innovation in higher education. Last year, with the CUNY Sociodemographics Map of NYC project, we explored the racial and ethnic characteristics of neighborhoods around CUNY’s 26 senior and community colleges as well as around CUNY’s professional and graduate schools throughout

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Why Do Research? Or, Why “The CUNY Map of NYC” Matters #FuturesEd

By Cathy Davidson|February 17, 2015|Reflection, Research|0 comments

Quality and Diversity Much has been written lately about the rise in quality of CUNY over the last two decades. Some have assumed that its rising quality means CUNY must have lost track of its honored populist commitments to New York City’s diverse population. That turns out not to be true, according to the careful demographic research published last week by Futures Initiative Fellow and Graduate Center doctoral student, Michael

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New analysis: “CUNY schools serve a student population as diverse as NYC —sometimes more so”

By Katina|February 11, 2015|Announcements, Research|0 comments

CUNY Sociodemographics Map of New York City: Part I – Race and Ethnicity CUNY schools serve a student population as diverse as NYC itself—and sometimes more so. New analysis by Michael Dorsch, Futures Initiative Fellow and Doctoral Student, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Graduate Center, City University of New York http://futuresinitiative.org/blog/2015/02/10/cuny-sociodemographics-map-of-new-york-city-part-i-race-and-ethnicity/ The Futures Initiative, a program of The Graduate Center, CUNY, is very pleased to present new research by Futures

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Visualizing the Growth of HASTAC and HASTAC Scholars

By Michael Dorsch|January 30, 2015|Research|0 comments

HASTAC has increased from a few hundred members in 2002 to a thriving online community that now includes more than 13,000 humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists, and technologists working together to transform the future of learning. The HASTAC Scholars fellowship program has also expanded with 55 students in the program in 2008-2009 to 242 students in 2013-2014. As The Futures Initiative and HASTAC@CUNY join the ongoing community discussions within HASTAC,

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HASTAC Scholars’ Pedagogy Project

By Kalle Westerling|January 29, 2015|Pedagogy Guide, Research|0 comments

HASTAC has just published its Pedagogy Project, which started about a year ago when several professors asked for specific suggestions on digital or collaborative projects they could do with their students. Fiona Barnett then asked the HASTAC Scholars to provide specific assignments, in-class exercises and other projects. The response was awesome — over 80 specific and proven suggestions to shake up your syllabus! The Pedagogy Project is organized into nine

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Gender Bias in Academe: An Annotated Bibliography of Important Recent Studies

By Danica Savonick|January 23, 2015|Research|0 comments

Danica Savonick and Cathy N. Davidson Overview The often unconscious and unintentional biases against women, including in academe, have been well documented in the autobiographical writings of authors such as Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Patricia Williams, and bell hooks. But is the experience they document merely “subjective”?  Several recent social science research studies, using strictly controlled methodologies, suggest that these first-person accounts of discrimination are representative, not simply anecdotal. The

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