Brian

  • Brian wrote a new post, AV impacts on Real Estate, on the site Mind The Gap 1 month ago

    This week I reviewed Brookfields 2017 Report “Autonomous Vehicles and the Potential Impacts on Real Estate.” The Brookfield report states that while there are many uncertainties about the impacts of AVs it see […]

    • It’s fascinating to imagine how AVs will change the landscape around us. I don’t have much to add except I think this is a great topic that people definitely aren’t thinking about enough.

    • so interesting, especially the idea of how our attention will shift from billboards to internal triggers inside the car….the new “man cave” will be inside our vehicles, maybe.

    • Echoing the others, I’d never have thought about the billboards. They seem so ubiquitous to our society, that I can’t imagine life w/o them. In pedestrian cities like NY/SF, is it still anticipated to change?

  • An article on something Amanda mentioned in class, the impact of blockchain (bitcoin specifically) on low energy cost (often rural) communities. It is also a good overview if you had the reaction “what the heck is […]

    • Given the role of mining in the american frontier, I find this irresistible: the virtual realm of cryptocurrency colliding with the real world of megawatts and real estate.

  • Brian wrote a new post, (no title), on the site Mind The Gap 1 month, 3 weeks ago

    Tyson’s blockchain presentation made me think of this article from last December – I think it’s well worth the read for anyone interested in blockchain, digital citizenship, or the future of government/civil society.

     

    • Estonia! isn’t it amazing that they may be the most innovative e-democracy on earth? or are there other countries doing similarly wide-scale projects?

  • The challenge I am exploring is how cities are and should adjust to changes in the future of work. I am particularly interested in the evolution of land use administration and how it has and continues to be shaped […]

    • so interesting to think about how land use regulation (new, old, contemplated), plays into our FOW scenarios. Hope you find a good set of examples of how “planning can utilize technology leads to more responsive administration!”

  • This week I noted a theme in our readings, the idea that in order to understand the future of work we must look at the whole picture of the future. I think this concept meshes well with both what many have noted […]

    • Great insight, Brian: we must look at entire systems to understand the future of work.
      I agree, think that underscores one of the biggest challenges — that we need a new vocabulary, a new set of interlocking agendas and abilities, interdisciplinary silo-busting thinking to plan for the future. It’s what I worry about most when I think about the role of higher education, where those guard rails are deeply rooted in our university culture.

  • I don’t blame you for taking Via! I had a horrible experience waiting for the new NYC Ferry service this weekend – where after waiting for an hour a Ferry employee told me I should probably just take an Uber or Lyft instead (after all, that’s what he does!)

  • With regards to wifi (or internet in general) I think municipal (or other government entity) owned systems are a necessity. The level of service provided in some major cities (NYC included) is astounding when compared to price. Establishment of such a system in Seattle was a hot topic when I lived there about 5 years ago. Ultimately they have…[Read more]

  • I love the discussion of pride and the role of work in generating it. I too had similar feelings with my first tax paying job. More recently I have begun to think about what structures that pride in our society (why does it feel so good to earn a paycheck?). I think it may be worth talking about work ethic and it’s role in capitalism.

  • I believe Wataru brings up a great point – about who teaches emotions. This is a similar question that I discuss a lot in my work (transportation planning) about self-driving cars. Like the self driving planes mentioned by Arelle above they assert that they will have fewer crashes than human drivers. While this may well be true, there will still…[Read more]

  • Tamar – I agree so much that young people’s professional aspiration is driven by economic necessity. It saddens me that older generations sometimes look down on this. The world has changed so significantly in recent decades that I think it becomes difficult for older and younger generations to have conversations about “work” or “career.” These…[Read more]

  • Brian commented on the post, WEEK 2: What is Work?, on the site Mind The Gap 3 months, 1 week ago

    Thanks for sharing your stories Marcus – as I read them I drew many parallels to experiences in my family. For example my father was recently laid off at age 60 and went through a similar experience trying to find work at an “advanced” age. My grandmother was also the oldest of 13 children and when her mother passed away at a young age she was…[Read more]

  • “work is almost always task-oriented in nonindustrial societies… and… it may be appropriate to tie wages to tasks and not directly to time in newly developing areas.” (Wilbert Moore, 1951)

    I found this quote a […]

    • Interesting thought, regarding whether the work trajectory is liner/exponential vs cyclical. I’d like to suggest another possibility, that perhaps it’s not so much cyclical, but rather, being paid for time spent on the job is a one-time anomaly in the history of work and humankind.

      I.e., prior to the industrial revolution, work was task-based. The industrial revolution brought us mills, factories etc, which led to people being paid for time spent on the job, a practice that continued as we moved to a post-industrial society, but a practice that likely will not survive. We may soon find that task-based work is most efficient and, as you suggested in your post, we will return to that system.

    • There is an analogy here to how we parcel out credits in higher education, focusing on time spent in classes. It will be interesting to get to our discussion about the future of universities when we have this broader context.

  • Filipa Pajevic, Richard Shearmur / City Lab

    August 31, 2018

    The key challenge I am following this week is how cities are and will continue to evolve as a result of changing work paradigms. The authors of […]

    • This topic interests me very much, Brian. Thank you for posting!

      I read this asking myself whether there are examples of cities that can set an example for how to adapt to the changing working world — and whether our own city is too large/unwieldy to make a conscious effort to adapt. Looking at the three key points in the article:

      Transportation — New York City has a transportation network that is starved of capital investment (and therefore innovation). 🙁

      Public amenities — For amenities such as wifi, workers would presumably need a high enough speed to support videoconferencing — and as far as I can tell, only Helsinki, with a municipal income tax of 18.5%, provides a service like that (https://qz.com/414061/helsinkis-free-city-wide-wi-fi-network-is-faster-than-your-home-internet/). Though they say it is not particularly expensive, so perhaps it is feasible.

      Building codes/zoning — I wonder how these ideas would translate into policy. Our own city’s recent rezonings are driven by a need for more housing. It seems to be the chief concern here, and most New Yorkers I know (especially in the outer boroughs) would be wary of creating the “cool” spaces talked about in this article, because of the fear that this would further drive up housing costs.

      My guess is that smaller cities — and/or former rust belt cities, where land and housing are inexpensive, but where economic activity is lagging — would be better poised to turn the ideas in this article into reality, to foster work environments for the next generation.

      I am curious to hear more of your thoughts on this.

      • With regards to wifi (or internet in general) I think municipal (or other government entity) owned systems are a necessity. The level of service provided in some major cities (NYC included) is astounding when compared to price. Establishment of such a system in Seattle was a hot topic when I lived there about 5 years ago. Ultimately they have decided not to go ahead with the project for now – citing major costs. In my view these costs are being paid no matter what. In our current system it is borne by each and every consumer paying for subpar access and gouging prices.

        I would challenge the assumption that NYC rezoning are “driven for the need for more housing.” I would agree that this is often how it is sold to the public but if you look closer I think profits in the real estate markets play a much larger role. This is exacerbated by the fact that (to my knowledge) New York City is the only major city in the US that has never had a comprehensive/master plan. I think this point is especially salient to the authors call for a comprehensive review of policy.

        I would recommend Tom Angotti’s book “Zoned Out! Race, Displacement, and City Planning in New York City” to anyone interested in the subject.

        I agree the the creation of “cool” spaces is a contentious subject for many New Yorkers. However, I think there is a way to create such spaces for current community members as well as new ones. There are several non-profits doing great work in this area such as the Neighborhood Plazas Partnership who have partnered with city agencies to created community spaces such as Corona Plaza. Of course I can cite numerous hip public places that are all too symbolic of the worst of gentrification as well.

        There is a lot of interesting work (both academic and practical) going on in the rejuvenation of rust belt cities. I am not super familiar myself but I think it would be interesting to follow up on in this class.

    • Given the growing urbanization of the world’s population, this is a key discussion point. When we get to talking about trends, we should focus specifically on public transportation, as you suggest. (I took Via to work this morning…..)

      • I don’t blame you for taking Via! I had a horrible experience waiting for the new NYC Ferry service this weekend – where after waiting for an hour a Ferry employee told me I should probably just take an Uber or Lyft instead (after all, that’s what he does!)

    • I thought this post had a unique angle when thinking about the future of work because usually, companies are the ones which adjust to changes in working environments. I am interested in where our class discussion will lead us on this matter. Also, I like the concept of a co-working place and wonder how cities can support such a concept.

    • Thank you for the recommendation of the Angotti book. I just added it to my Amazon wishlist (though I bummed there’s no kindle version 😤). I’ve been watching the rezonings across the city and will soon be dealing with one in a more hands-on way professionally.

      Corona Plaza looks like a great project for all residents — longtime and new. Closer to where I live and work, we’re getting a waterfront plaza park in Mariners Harbor, Staten Island. Though it won’t look like the other DOT plaza parks, it is part of the same program, and local residents are VERY eager to see it completed.

      As for municipal WiFi, you’re saying that the level of service is astoundingly good? I actually find myself turning off WiFi on my phone when I’m on a subway or ferry, because the pop up page to agree to terms rarely comes up for me. It would be great if it were high speed and seamless.

      Your experiences with rideshare and public transit say a lot about the shortcomings of our current network 🙁 Congestion pricing + capital investment in public transit is long overdue.

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